Friday, April 19, 2019

Minoru Obira at Lux Art Institute and Jean Lowe Carpet Showroom at Quint

by Patricia Frischer


Our hats go off to Guusje Sanders, the Associate Curator at the Lux Art Institute. Her selection of artists for guest residency have been outstanding. Minoru Obira is no exception. With wood, resin, graphite and slate, he makes elegant primal shapes that are rich with texture and stylish while they also seem to be ageless.


Volcano series



Beginning

Detail Beginning

Wind Stands

Bird 2


Santa Ana Winds

Detail Santa Ana Winds

Tortuga #2

Grove of Shrine

Floating Weed

My Town

Detail of My Town

Detail of My Town




Carpet Showroom by Jean Lowe at Quint Contemporary Art

A tiny room  full of the most wonderful carpets just like you might find in a middle or far eastern marketplace. Look closely and they are all painted paper mache and even the small one dumped in the corner is paper.  I took one picture of my bare feet as the sign said you could walk on these carpets but I could not bring myself to step on them with shoes! Sorry to publish this after the show is over, but hopefully the picture and video I took will give you a good idea. Never miss a Jean Lowe show even if you have to go at the last hours of the last day. 











A final salute to Michael James Armstrong also at Quint Contemporary Art for his Line & Fuzz exhibition. By far my favorite work was the room installation. Here are two views, straight on and from an angle so you get a little idea of the scale of the piece. 




Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Desert X from Palm Springs to the Salton Sea

by Patricia Frischer


The second year of Desert X is now on view until April 21. These installation are from artists from all over the world. They are hard to find but they have made it easier if you have an iphone (which I do not!). So we just have to search and trust to luck and a small gathering of others to make sure that X marked the spot. 

We could not attempt to see all the installation so I choose ones to hunt out that had a visual component that seemed compelling. The first two at the Salton Sea near Mecca, were just absent.  Maybe bad weather destroyed them or they were more temporary than reported. But we got to see the Salton Sea which is now full and quite lovely. And we did not give up. Instead we were lucky to find a few replacements on view (not part of Desert X) but restoring our confidence that public art could be mysterious and awe inspiring, 


Etherea by Edoardo Tresoldi
This large structure is made all of chicken wire and is quite magnificent. It is on permanent display at the corner of 6th St and Caesar Chavez (formally Harrison) in Coachella Valley. It was installed during the festival and the Mayor fell in love with it and managed to obtain it for the city.  





Desert Warren by Karen and Tony Barone
These dumb bunnies do put a smile on your face and sometimes that is all you need to get through the day. Across the street was a rainbow made out of re bar and painted in similar colors. Lover's Rainbow by Pia Coordinates  simply did not look worth the effort to stride out into the desert to look more closely. 




Dive-In by Superflex
This was our first real Desert X work of the trip and although we were not able to see the video component that was only display on a Sat night between 6 and 8, we were still charmed by the color and the texture of this painted structure. Evidently the video projects an undersea fantasy of what the desert would look like if it was once again underwater. The pink color made everyone look rosy and provided tons of photo opportunities. Not sure this is great art, but it was a relief to see any art at all finally. 








Western Flag by John Gerrard
Luckily the next day was more successful still. Our favorite work was this huge LED display of a pole emitting plumbs of oil making a flag shape. On coming very close you could see the foreground and background were shifting as the recording was pivoting. As it turns the oil flow shifts as if the winds was shifting. 





Ghost Palm by Kathleen Ryan

Finding this work entailed a drive on a dirt road and a trust in the process of hide and seek.  The real luck was the breeze picking up just at the right time so we could record this work as it moved and played it wind song. 






Specter by Sterling Ruby

Weaving back and forth through out the valley, racking up miles as we criss-crossed the terrain, our last stop was this simple box constructed out of different shades of orange, casting shadows, reflecting its glow and some times even appearing almost flat from a distance at certain angles. I like the reflection of the clouds which then led you to reflect on the desert around you and the mountain backdrop. 





 Of course it is hard to compete with the natural beauty of the snow topped mountains that are a back drop to all of Palm Springs. And if you go soon, you can also see some of the desert in bloom.


We reported on the first Desert X in 2017 if you want to view more reports.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Life Doesn't Frighten Me: Hope Inspired through Art at Fallbrook Library


I have a few of my own paintings in a show Life Doesn't Frighten Me: Hope Inspired through Art at Fallbrook Library (124 S Mission Rd, Fallbrook, CA 92028) from  March 10 - May 4, I am starting to show my own art again as I make time in my life for more of my own creations.  Some of these works were created in England after our trip to India, for example the following two: Brave Hand and Power Digits My work for this show is about the sense of safety that a child needs to grow up confident and how they turn to adults to supply that security,


Patricia Frischer


Patricia Frischer

Patricia Frischer

Patricia Frischer

Patricia Frischer







My dear friend Kira Carrillo Corser, Co-founder Compassionate ARTS in Action  (kiracorser@gmail.com 510.684.4651) has been working with Fallbrook Library Arts to put this multi-media project together and includes much more than just an art exhibition with poetry, music and video performed at the opening. 
Kira Corser's idea was to showcase how art might help reduce the huge suicide rate which continues to escalate in children and teens.  How can that be achieved? The exhibition highlights how parents and our society as a whole needs to be involved to protect our children. They need to make sure children are not abused, that they are loved and educated. Children need to find their voices and be aided to define themselves. The Arts can play a large role in empowering them to do that and to heal from past horrors or even just subtle belittlings.  Some of the artists in the show revealed their own frightening episodes and how the arts helped them to overcome fear. Others admitted they are still frightened and turn to art regularly to express themselves and find solace. 
I hope you can visit this beautiful area of San Diego County during the run of the exhibition. You can read more  and see a selection of images from this exhibition below.
Kira Carrillo Corser (Fallbrook), Patricia Frischer (Cardiff), Aldonia Bailey (Pasadena), Heather Bonds (Alameda), Helen Redman (San Diego), Renee Scott-Femenella (Sacramento), Brecia Kralovic-Logan (San Diego), Adeola D-aiyeloja (Redlands),Sergio V. Sanchez Mereno (La Hambra), Marilyn Huerta (San Marcos), Jennifer Colby (Monterey/Aromas) and Grace Adams (Oceanside).

Kira Carrillo Corser "We need more art programs that give a meaningful voice to life experiences so kids don't feel so alone. Art classes are often the place where youth can talk about issues and get understanding and help," said Kira Carrillo Corser. She has worked with schools, universities and community groups for 30 years. Kira worked as a photographer and journalist for KPBS TV and Radio in San Diego and then taught Social Justice art at CSU Monterey Bay and promoted meaningful art classes as Director of Arts in Education in Monterey County. 

Helen Redman


Aldonia Bailey works at a shelter for homeless families, and she said the child often becomes the parent when the family is in crisis.

Heather Bonds

Marilyn Huerta


Jennifer Colby 

Adeola D-aiyeloja
Sergio V. Sanchez Mereno

Renee Scott-Femenella

Grace Adams


Brecia Kralovic-Logan

The exhibition titled, " Life Doesn't Frighten Me: Hope Inspired Through Art, based on a poem by Maya Angelou. Teen suicide is soaring and Black and Brown youth teens currently have the highest rate of attempted suicide.  We feel youth need a way to find more hope. Art can uniquely give voice to their feelings, validate experience and strengthen supports. This exhibit brings together stories, photography, paintings and fabric art from the perspectives of 12 artists who work to help kids and youth, plus collaborative artwork created with professional artists in this show and 40 students from Fallbrook High and CSUSM, Los Angeles and San Diego.

The opening reception is March 15, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, with a special performance by Fe Love, a Los Angeles award winning spoken word artist at 7:00 pm, a jazz poem by Aldonia Bailey from Pasadena, and a flute song by nationally known composer, author and Vista resident, Maria Kostelas.  The 12 visual artists in this show are: Kira Carrillo Corser (Fallbrook), Patricia Frischer (Cardiff), Aldonia Bailey (Pasadena), Heather Bonds (Alameda), Helen Redman (San Diego), Renee Scott-Femenella (Sacramento), Brecia Kralovic-Logan (San Diego), Adeola D-aiyeloja (Redlands),Sergio V. Sanchez Mereno (La Hambra), Marilyn Huerta (San Marcos), Jennifer Colby (Monterey/Aromas) and Grace Adams (Oceanside).
Every child needs a Safe Harbor, a place they can feel hopeful, so some of the life Issues in this show include coping with Safety & Justice; Immigration; Climate Change, Refugees, Suicide and Illness, balanced with Love, Compassion and Peace. This collection of art, is brought to the library by Kira Carrillo Corser, a Fallbrook artist and co-founder of Compassionate ARTS in Action. Posts for Peace and Justice and Compassionate ARTS in Action is a partnership of artists working with students, communities and nonprofits to paint "Visual Conversations" - artwork on 8-foot painted Posts. Posts will be on display at the library reception and some will continue to exhibit until May 4th. These posts were made by local Fallbrook High Migrant Ed students, along with posts made with CSU San Marcos students, Los Angeles and San Diego youth and teacher/artists.

A special event designed to help people build resilience will be on March 31st, when composer and author Maria Kostelas will perform her one person interactive Literary Concert, "The Gift of the Singing Stick: Through Healing Your Worst Tragedy You Can Discover Your Greatest Gift."

The work in this exhibition strives to promote hope, to encourage community support, and envision a better more compassionate future of peace and justice.  Come see what they all have to say about overcoming life obstacles and building hope!

More background:

Since, kids cope better when they don't feel alone, when they have a group of friends or family where they feel heard.  So the opening night reception will include painted collaborative Posts for Peace and Justice  created with:

·       Fallbrook High's Migrant Education Students, California State University San Marcos and local Fallbrook and San Diego and Los Angeles artists
·       Refugee Students in El Cajon and San Diego
·       Compassionate ARTS in Action's Posts with Black and Brown Youth from Los Angeles, Santa Monica and Pasadena