Monday, July 15, 2019

Light and Space: Contemporary Continuations at Cannon Gallery

By Patricia Frischer

Adam Belt

William D. Cannon Gallery in Carlsbad presents the work of Adam Belt, Kaori Fukuyama, and Rebecca Webb who together filled the gallery from June 23 to August 25 with light and space. Chase Dougherty was the curator for this particular show, which is a contemporary take on a southern Californian theme from the 1960's. Our incredible light and open spaces even in urban setting was the inspiration for this movement and now we are getting a little local 2.0 version.

We just reported on  Adam Belt at Quint Gallery and are happy to see more of his work at the Cannon Gallery. The central space of the gallery is home to an overhead installation (see the image above) which filters the light into a magic square.  I might not have the patience or stamina to stand under this tent like structure for long, but I did a twirl and the light shifted as my body moved. I felt like  a child would want to lay down on a bean bag and stare upward as if star gazing.  These and the other work in the show are subtle along the lines of the artist James Turrell who said, "We eat light, drink it in through our skins."


Adam Belt
It takes time to be able to focus on the very slight floating rainbow edged affect of the light projected on this tiny glass bead covered canvas. It was only when I stood back a long ways that I was able to see the full circle of light. 


Adam Belt

Adam Belt
I was fascinated by the sculptures and installation by Kaori Fukuyama. I had seen previous examples of her paintings, but these 3-d works were actually magical. In some you could see the shadow they cast or the light they reflected more than you can see the actual materials they were made from. The eye is tricked but not necessarily intentionally which makes these works more authentic and less theatrical. Please take a look at the video because it is only by moving around this work, that it reveals itself. 
Kaori Fukuyama







Kaori Fukuyama - the darker lines are the shadow, the lighter ones the clear cubes that cast the shadows. 

Kaori Fukuyama

Kaori Fukuyama

Kaori Fukuyama
For Rebecca Webb leaving nature alone is just not enough .Her photos are rather like poetic interventions into landscapes. I apologize for the gallery reflections in this images. They are poor substitutes for the real thing. So go and see them in person...in fact all these works really need to be seen live so I hope this tempts you to catch them before like light and space, they disappear.  
Rebecca Webb

Rebecca Webb

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Birthing a New Arts Organization in East and South County


By Patricia Frischer




On July 6, 2019 a fairly large group (36) of East and South County visual and performing arts leaders gathered together at the Bonita Museum and Cultural Center to give birth to a new organization. It is not named yet, nor does it have a logo, but the energy and enthusiasm was more than apparent. It may end up with a very noble mission and vision and it may even set lofty goals, but this particular birth bodes well as it has already established an attitude of positive progress.

The people who attended had lots of needs and wishes, but I think the most important ones were to be heard and to be understood and most important to be appreciated. You may think that sounds pretty basic. What about programs and funding and promotion!  But learning about our neighbors in a respectful way is actually key to future connection and to building an arts community that has power not just in its size but through its common beliefs.

Blanca lucia Bergman photo by Anna Siqueiros


Blanca Lucia Bergman of Art Unites introduced herself as the Executive Administrator of this group (name yet to be determined but probably ESCAN or SECAN). She was hired by San Diego Visual Arts Network to launch this much needed hub.

Anna Siqueiros - Siqueiros Foundation spoke about the importance of being a united front and artists as visionaries. She was passionate about laying a path for future generations and the need to make a commitment to move forward together.

Lynnette Tessitore -  Cultural Art Manager for City of Chula Vista reminded us that each part of the county has its own dynamic personality. This grass roots approach is a good way to build community.

John Campbell – Offered the services of Smorgborg for a directory and events calendar plus a way to connect as communities online. This means that the new baby does not have to worry about emails and websites and can concentrate on social media.

Naomi NussbaumSynergy Arts Foundation volunteered the services of the North County Arts Network for advice and support. But they realize that this new east and south county organization will have different goals and will use different strategies to reach those goals.

I was particularly delighted to welcome Larry Baza, the vice chairman of the California Arts Council who attended as an observer. Larry was formerly a director of the SD County Arts Council many years ago before it was absorbed in the Commission for Arts and Culture. He is keen to see San Diego once more have an Art Council as it is the only county in California not to have one.

We see this new southern and eastern group joining with the northern group and maybe a group in central San Diego to reform such an organization. The baby would then be fully mature and ready to step into its major role as a force for arts and culture in our county.

More than 50 pages of notes were compiled from this meeting with everyone joining in to contribute an idea, a venue, or a belief. A mission and vision will surface With a clear show of hands we got the go ahead to start meeting monthly to pin down some goals and priorities. Yes, there will be much more networking but I was taken by the much stronger description by Francisco Eme, The Front Gallery in San Ysidro, “We should embrace each other.”

If you want to join in this effort to support arts and culture in the east and south  part of San Diego County, join the mailing list of this new organization by subscribing at this link.  Their next meeting will be in August. For more details, read their last email.  

P.S. I am writing this on July 9, 2019 the date that my niece made me a great aunt with a baby girl of 8 pounds and 8 oz. Blame that for the title of this article!

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Kaleidoscope of Dance exhibition at Sergott Contemporary Art Alliance

Raymond Elstad
By Patricia Frischer

Kaleidoscope of Dance is an exhibition including an entire selection of Raymond Elstad's dance themed photographs at Sergott Contemporary Art Alliance in Rancho Santa Fe. There is also an honored featured artist, his wife Rosemary KimBal showing one of her Zen brush painting. The female form is further featured in the bronze sculptures of Farnaz Harouni

This exhibition opened with a gala fundraiser for the City Ballet but it is now open by appointment only in the Rancho Santa Fe gallery of Tom and Ann Sergott. 858.756.2377



Ann Sergott and  Rosemary KimBal


Rosemary KimBal with her dancer image. This work is made with five strokes of a giant brush.

Raymond Elstad
 Raymond Elstad has never taken a typical dance photos. Instead, he digs deep to find the most interesting compositions to reveal the honest work of being a dancer. His authentic images show the stress and drive of this profession. There are more than 30 images in this show but this is just a small percentage of a lifetime of images that he has made on this subject featuring dancers from so many of our local dance companies.  Elstad has a very specific point of view and his photographs are instantly recognizable. He uses a tool that many have but he is able to be totally unique.

Raymond Elstad

Raymond Elstad

Raymond Elstad

Raymond Elstad

Gallery View

Gallery View

Farnaz Harouni

Monday, July 1, 2019

Richard Allen Morris and John Rogers at RB Stevenson in La Jolla

by Patricia Frischer


RB Stevenson celebrates his one year anniversary in this new glorious space and has been representing Morris and Rogers for more than 30 years.

Methodology and Process at RB Stevenson Gallery includes work by Richard Allen Morris and John Rogers in La Jolla until July 20, 2019. More info: 858.459.3917

I am a huge fan of Richard Allen Morris. He was one of our first SD Art Prize recipients and no one handles paint as well as this master of the thick and gooey. You have a chance to see more of his work at the MCASD  More Like a Forest: Paintings and Sculptures by Richard Allen Morris until Oct 27

He is coupled in this show with John Rogers who painstakingly puts together elegant totems constructed of corrugated cardboard. The material no longer looks fragile except when you rotate your view and catch the tiny little notches of air revealed by the precise angles of the cuts.





John Rogers: Detail showing the precision and affect of cutting of the corrugated cardboard

John Rogers

John Rogers sculpture with William Allen Morris painting

John Rogers sculpture with William Allen Morris painting

A cityscape of smaller works by John Rogers


William Allen Morris

William Allen Morris

William Allen Morris

William Allen Morris

John Rogers sculpture with William Allen Morris painting

One last view in the gallery of a line of glass sculptures by Italo Scanga setting high on top of a book shelf looking as fresh as the day they were made. 


Adam Belt at Quint Gallery

by Patricia Frischer


Adam Belt: Almost There at Quint Gallery  (5171 Santa Fe Street, SD 92109) until July 6, 2019


This exhibition is so well thought out that I have to say Belt belted one out of the park.  You walk by some quite subtle low relief topography wall work in a muted grey but with tiny glass beads that gleam in certain light from certain angles.  As you round the corner into the larger space you are struck by the appearance of a lighted bolt which appears to be a crack in the far wall. But to get to that you come across two cauldrons one all white and one with a turquoise tint (like tarnished copper)  filled with the most lovely naturally formed crystals. If you have followed Belt's work you know that there is a yin/yang balance  played out between science and religion in his work.

Close up detail of wall work above

Natural patterns which seem to have been created from rivulets of liquid like streams and tributaries or branching frost 


On closer inspection the lighted crack in the wall looks like it goes all the way to China even through it is at the most 4 inches deep or maybe even less.







The following two works are called Rock of Ages. This very natural looking rock is actually constructed from layers of natural materials of graduated  ages from very ancient to current held together with glue,.

This mottled stone is actually made of communion wafer compacted and glued. This one is cracked open like a geode and salted with a solution to make crystals.


Close up of crystals

Crystal making solution in center of cauldron. 


Melissa Walter at Ice Gallery, Bread and Salt

by Patricia Frischer

Melissa Walter at Ice Gallery (1955 Julian Ave, SD 92113)  opening Jun 29, 2019

North Wall, Ice Gallery

I can imagine that ours is not the only universe out there and Melissa Walters takes this as a jumping off places for this site specific installation at Ice Gallery. The multiple little pyramid shapes represent to me the funnel into a black hole leading us to multi-verses that are never ending. But in this universe, in this solar system, on this earth, in this city and in this space, Walters has been influenced by the one beautiful window that connects the inside to the outside.





South Wall, Ice Gallery

Detail with shadow